Medical Documents and Suggestions When Traveling with Your Pet

Medical Documents and Suggestions When Traveling with Your PetWhen traveling with your pet, you need to prepare with a cat or dog friendly hotel and the right gear, but gear and lodging are not the only  things you need. In addition to thinking of your pet’s physical and emotional needs, you need to  think about her medical needs as well. A hotel,  food dish, leash and crates are all important, but  there are also some documents you will need to show that your animal is in good health and  ready to travel.

Visit Your Vet

Pet friendly travel starts with a healthy pet. Several weeks or even a month before you travel, take your pet to the vet for a full checkup.  Tell your vet your travel plans, and ask if he thinks your pet is healthy enough to go with you. While you are there, request a Certificate of Good Health. This may be called a zoo sanitary certificate or a veterinary certificate, depending on your location, but it  basically states that your pet is healthy enough to travel and has had all necessary  vaccinations.

This document is required for traveling just about anywhere. It may be required by your airline, customs officials or your pet friendly hotel staff. Keep in mind that some countries will require this form to be certified by the USDA or that country’s consulate for your pet to enter or exit, so find out what the requirements are before you go if you plan to travel internationally.

Ask your vet for a copy of your pet’s medical records. This is particularly important if your pet has an ongoing medical condition that could require help while you are traveling. Having a copy of your pet’s medical records will allow an emergency vet to know exactly how to treat your pet should you face an emergency. Also, bring a copy of your vet’s contact information in case you need to get in contact with him while you travel.

International Travel Forms

In addition to the Certificate of Good Health, you may need to have other forms to travel to European Union Countries. This may include the inoculation record, EU Form 998, a rabies certificate and an import permit. Combined, these documents are sometimes called a “pet passport.”

To find out the specific requirements of the location you are visiting, inquire with the country’s consulate before making your final travel arrangements. If you are traveling to a rabies free country, including Australia, Malta, the UK, New Zealand and a few others, you may need to have proof of a blood test showing that your pet is rabies free. Some areas actually require incoming pets to be quarantined, while others may require a microchip.  For instance, in the UK, the quarantine period is six months. This can be a shocking surprise if you are just going on vacation, and suddenly your pet is retained at the border or you are forced to pay for an exam or microchip. Before you leave, call the embassy or consulate to find out these rules.

Returning to the US

When you travel internationally with your pet, you may have to have an examination before your pet will be allowed back into the US. This requirement will depend on the country you visited. It is designed to prevent diseases, such as screwworm, from re- entering the United States. If this is not required, you may want to have your pet seen by your vet after your return just to ensure that she did not pick up any parasites during your travels.

Medical Considerations

As you are getting all of the documents ready for your trip, do not forget to have a sufficient amount of your pet’s medications. You do not want to run out while you are traveling and do not have access to your vet. Your veterinarian will be able to give you sufficient dosage to cover your travel period and a little bit beyond.

As you shop for a pet friendly accommodation option, remember this: when traveling with your pet, her safety and health should be your primary concern. If your vet says she is  able to travel, and you have the necessary documents and medications, then you should be able to enjoy a trip together once you find the right dog or cat friendly hotel. If not, then consider choosing a pet sitter or a quality boarding kennel where your pets can stay while you travel. It is far better to come home to a happy, healthy friend than to risk your pet’s health just to have companionship on your trip.

When traveling with your pet, you need to prepare with a cat or dog friendly hotel and the right gear, but gear and lodging are not the only things you need. In addition to thinking of your pet’s physical and emotional needs, you need to think about her medical needs as well. A hotel, food dish, leash and crates are all important, but there are also some documents you will need to show that your animal is in good health and ready to travel.

Visit Your Vet

Pet friendly travel starts with a healthy pet. Several weeks or even a month before you travel, take your pet to the vet for a full checkup. Tell your vet your travel plans, and ask if he thinks your pet is healthy enough to go with you. While you are there, request a Certificate of Good Health. This may be called a zoo sanitary certificate or a veterinary certificate, depending on your location, but it basically states that your pet is healthy enough to travel and has had all necessary vaccinations.

This document is required for traveling just about anywhere. It may be required by your airline, customs officials or your pet friendly hotel staff. Keep in mind that some countries will require this form to be certified by the USDA or that country’s consulate for your pet to enter or exit, so find out what the requirements are before you go if you plan to travel internationally.

Ask your vet for a copy of your pet’s medical records. This is particularly important if your pet has an ongoing medical condition that could require help while you are traveling. Having a copy of your pet’s medical records will allow an emergency vet to know exactly how to treat your pet should you face an emergency. Also, bring a copy of your vet’s contact information in case you need to get in contact with him while you
travel.

International Travel Forms

In addition to the Certificate of Good Health, you may need to have other forms to travel to European Union Countries. This may include the inoculation record, EU Form 998, a rabies certificate and an import permit. Combined, these documents are sometimes called a “pet passport.”

To find out the specific requirements of the location you are visiting, inquire with the country’s consulate before making your final travel arrangements. If you are traveling to a rabies free country, including Australia, Malta, the UK, New Zealand and a few others, you may need to have proof of a blood test showing that your pet is rabies free.

Some areas actually require incoming pets to be quarantined, while others may require a microchip. For instance, in the UK, the quarantine period is six months. This can be a shocking surprise if you are just going on vacation, and suddenly your pet is retained at the border or you are forced to pay for an exam or microchip. Before you leave, call the embassy or consulate to find out these rules.

Returning to the US

When you travel internationally with your pet, you may have to have an examination before your pet will be allowed back into the US. This requirement will depend on the country you visited. It is designed to prevent diseases, such as screwworm, from re- entering the United States. If this is not required, you may want to have your pet seen by your vet after your return just to ensure that she did not pick up any parasites during your travels.

Medical Considerations

As you are getting all of the documents ready for your trip, do not forget to have a sufficient amount of your pet’s medications. You do not want to run out while you are traveling and do not have access to your vet. Your veterinarian will be able to give you sufficient dosage to cover your travel period and a little bit beyond.

As you shop for a pet friendly accommodation option, remember this: when traveling with your pet, her safety and health should be your primary concern. If your vet says she is able to travel, and you have the necessary documents and medications, then you should be able to enjoy a trip together once you find the right dog or cat friendly hotel. If not, then consider choosing a pet sitter or a quality boarding kennel where your pets can stay while you travel. It is far better to come home to a happy, healthy friend than to risk your pet’s health just to have companionship on your trip.

Medical Documents and Suggestions When Traveling with Your Pet